1st Female USADT Commander

1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), and her Soldiers perform, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo)

1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), and her Soldiers perform, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo)


Being a female officer in a mostly male military is not the easiest job; however, there are women who continue to tear down the walls and barriers that have prevented them from certain positions.
1st Lt. Lauran Glover, a military police officer, has paved the way for women in the U.S. Army when she was recently selected as the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard).
For more than 50 years, the USADT has showcased the U.S. Army both nationally and internationally through breathtaking routines with bayonet-tipped 1903 Springfield rifles.
As the commander, Glover will lead that team of Soldiers in drill and ceremony during performances for military, government, non-profit, and civilian organizations.
“I am honored and proud for this opportunity to represent the Army, women and my country,” said Glover.
A graduate of the officer candidate school, Glover was first assigned as a military police officer at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Following that assignment, she became a platoon leader for the 289th Military Police [MP] Company (The Old Guard) on Joint Base Myer – Henderson Hall, Va.
“When I joined the Army, I had know idea the Army even had a drill team,” said Glover. “After I saw one of their performances, I knew I wanted to be part of that team and their legacy.”
She added only at The Old Guard can a Soldier conduct tactical training one day and then perform a world-class ceremony for the American public on the next day.
Performing in ceremonies is nothing new to Glover; after all, she was as a key member in the Military District of Washington’s 2014 Twilight Tattoo [TLT] and Spirit of America [SOA] performances.
TLT and SOA are live-action military pageants featuring Soldiers from The Old Guard and the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own.” They give a glimpse into American history through performances by The U.S. Army Blues, vocalists from The U.S. Army Band Downrange and U.S. Army Band Voices, The Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps, and The U.S. Army Drill Team.
“I enjoyed my time as a narrator during those shows,” said Glover. “It took countless hours of preparation and execution to prepare for the crowds averaging in the thousands from all across the country.”
Glover’s performances earned her numerous positive comments from not only the attendees but also from the senior leadership at The Old Guard.
“I have great leaders at here, and their experience and guidance has helped mold me to be the commander of the drill team,” said Glover. “It shows that if you work hard it doesn’t matter your race or gender.”
Glover said she is happy that more women in the military are stepping up to take on rolls traditionally filled by men.
“I hope I do inspire other women and Soldiers just as I was inspired by my mother, who also serve in the military,” said Glover. “If you want to be or do something, it is all up to that individual.”

1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), leads her Soldiers during a half-time performance, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo)

1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), leads her Soldiers during a half-time performance, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo)

Tabbed Out: Maj. Michael R. Thompson

THOMPSON     Adorned on their uniforms, tabs and badges display how a soldier has reached an upper echelon of expertise in the profession.

Maj. Michael R. Thompson has earned the Ranger tab and the Senior Parachutist’s badge.

Thompson earned his Ranger tab in 2003 as a second lieutenant.

Thompson’s motivation for earning the Ranger tab was not for notoriety.

Thompson said his chief motivation was perception.

“For me, going to Ranger school I thought was important because I knew I was going to be an infantry platoon leader,” said Thompson. “I would be arriving as the newest member of the platoon. So I wanted to have every tool I could get.”

As a second lieutenant, Thompson said if he had shown up without a Ranger tab, his platoon would assume he had failed Ranger school.

“I wanted to show up with whatever small amount of credibility I could get,” said Thompson.

Thompson attended Ranger Assessment and Selection Program (RASP) in 2010.

RASP is a program designed to eliminate candidates who are not capable of assignment to 75th Ranger Regiment.

The training severely limits the amount of sleep and constantly punishes perspective Rangers.

Ultimately, Rangers are looking for leaders said Thompson said of the now eight-week course. “You work under conditions where there is extreme physical and emotional stress.”

Perspective Rangers must learn what their limitations are while learning how to motivate themselves and others, said Thompson.

“To do things even though it’s not going to be mentally, physically, or emotionally easy,” said Thompson.

The grueling process led to a position earned in 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

While in 2/75 from 2011-2013, Thompson deployed twice to Afghanistan.

The most memorable moment for Thompson during his deployment was the quick tempo of Ranger operations.

“We conducted special operations raids with very short notice,” said Thompson. “And had amazing effects on the enemy.”

The difficult training cycle aside, Thompson looks at his time in the 2/75 as incredibly rewarding.

“The 75th Ranger Regiment has advanced equipment and training not found in any other unit,” said Thompson. “Rangers frequently jump out of airplanes, fly in helicopters, drive unique special operations vehicles, detonate explosives, or conduct a live-fires during training and real world operations.”

“It’s all the stuff every Infantryman joined the Army to do,” said Thompson.

Thompson’s other accomplishments include a Senior Parachutist’s badge, awarded after a soldier is both Airborne (Three week course) and Jumpmaster (Two week course) qualified.

The Senior Parachutist’s badge identify a leader on Airborne missions, Thompson said. The badge is awarded after a combination of 30 specific types of jumps with a minimum of 15 jumps that include combat equipment.

“The hardest thing about jumpmaster school though is the attention to detail required,” said Thompson. “I think that’s the biggest piece translated to the Old Guard is the attention to detail.”

Leadership skills learned in Ranger school now help Thompson in his new position with the Old Guard.

“Our mission here is obviously a very important and highly visible mission,” said Thompson. “Its one that just like anywhere else, leaders need to make good decisions and take care of soldiers.”

“That’s all stuff I learned how to do in Ranger school,” said Thompson.

Thompson said badges do not tell the whole story of a soldier, however.

“All these badges and medals everything you wear on your uniform, all that is just a first impression,” said Thompson. “The second you start working with someone, you find out what they are really like.”

“When you start working for subordinates and those that you work for, immediately they make and assessment on you,” said Thompson. “Its deeper then just whatever badges and medals you are wearing.”

Thompson joined the Army 12 years ago and has been assigned to the Old Guard for the past two.

The differences between The Old Guard and other units are obvious, Thompson said. Fundamentally, the mission here is unlike other units.

However, the core foundation for success is the same.

“Leadership qualities, the day-to-day, a lot of it is really similar here,” said Thompson. “One thing that is difference is we are working with hand-picked, high quality soldiers and NCOs (non-comissioned officers).”

“I think it’s important here to lead from the front and lead by example,” said Thompson. “Being a caring leader is also important here.”

Thompson said he eats in the dining facility daily. It is important to know how soldiers are being treated, he said.

Thompson also does regular drill and ceremony training. He said it is important if he expects his staff to march around in the heat, he do so as well.

Thompson sees the Old Guard performing its role as meeting the public’s perception of a soldier.

“We are the face of the army,” said Thompson. “We provide that unit that looks like the United States Army. What we want the United States Army to look like, what the American people want the United States Army to look like.”

It is in this way Thompson’s tab and badge mirror the Old Guard.

The Old Guard meets expectations.

The Old Guard Overcomes Summer Heat

ARLINGTON, VA—Summer is here and temperatures in the National Capital region will reach the mid-90’s for the week.

The humidity makes the temperature feel like it is over 100 degrees.

It would be the ultimate sign of disrespect to fallout in front of the Unknowns, said Sgt. Callaway. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

It would be the ultimate sign of disrespect to fallout in front of the Unknowns, said Sgt. Callaway. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

Tomb Sentinels and memorial affairs escorts assigned to the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) don’t get the luxury of cooler clothing to beat the heat.

The members of The Old Guard maintain strict ceremonial composure in wool jackets and pants.

“They act like it doesn’t effect them at all,” said Nicole Smith, a visitor to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (TUS) from Lenoir, North Carolina. “It’s very humbling.”

Sgt. David W. Schutt, assigned to Hotel Company, 3d U.S. Inf. Regt. at Joint Base Myer Henderson-Hall has been in The Old Guard for three years.

The Temperature has been in the 90's for 11 straight days. With humidity, it feels even warmer. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

The Temperature has been in the 90’s for 11 straight days. With humidity, it feels even warmer. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)           

“You have to ensure you hydrate at all times,” said Schutt. “Especially for the long hours that we put in.”

Sgt. Seth B. Callaway, a relief commander at the TUS, echoed that advice for sentinels.

“Drink water,” Callaway said. “You drink water, you won’t pass out.”

The most difficult part isn’t necessarily the scorching temperatures and zero shade, but keeping the uniforms looking sharp.

Members of The Old Guard have the honor of performing up to 25 full honor ceremonies in a given week, said Schutt.

Soldiers feel honored to conduct memorial affairs despite harsh weather conditions. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

Soldiers feel honored to conduct memorial affairs despite harsh weather conditions. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

“You sweat through your uniform,” said Schutt. “The wrinkles stay in there more.”

Glue holding together the medal racks pinned to the soldier’s chests melts under the hot temperatures, said Schutt.

The shoe polish on the sentinel’s feet also melts in the sun, said Callaway.

TUS sentinels wear special dress shoes with steel plates attached to their heel and toes.

The shoe polish on the “steels” liquefies and the leather absorbs it, giving the shoes a greyish appearance, said Callaway.

Soldiers conducting memorial affairs wear chloroframs on their feet.

These black, high gloss dress shoes heat up in the direct sunlight, Schutt said. At times it can feel like your toes are burning, said Schutt.

The Chapel is the starting point for most memorial missions for The Old Guard. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

The Chapel is the starting point for most memorial missions for The Old Guard. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

Chloroframs have wooden soles that are unforgiving during marches to burial sites Soldiers perform as part of memorial affairs missions.

Blisters are common occurrences during these marches due to the inevitably sweaty feet. Most marches are well over a mile, said Schutt.

Callaway said the training that Soldiers go through prepares them for hot days.

Soldiers do a two hour “be on the look out” before ever walking the mat at the tomb, said Callaway.

“When you first come into The Old Guard, you are tested on standing proficiency,” said Schutt. “It gets you use to standing at attention, and gets you acclimated to the heat. Especially in a 100% wool uniform.”

The progression allows them to endure any kind of weather and maintain their composure, said Callaway.

Marches to the burial sites for the honored fallen are typically over a mile long. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

Marches to the burial sites for the honored fallen are typically over a mile long. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc Brandon Dyer)

“It’s a different kind of hot here,” said Smith.

“Its pretty tough,” said Schutt. “I realize I’m doing it for the families, and just suck it up, and know that I’m doing it for a fallen brother or sister in arms.”

Callaway said the best strategy for dealing with grueling temperatures is mental toughness.

“It’s a mind game,” said Callaway. “If you don’t let yourself think it’s hot, it won’t be hot.”

Plenty of Help to Getting to Final Walk

The attention to detail and precision required by soldier’s responsible for guarding the Tomb of the Unknowns Soldier requires an almost impossible level of discipline and dedication.As the Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Raymond T. Odierno said, “the soldier’s family is what makes him strong.”

It’s only with the help of one’s support system that make it a possibility.

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr., known as Andy to his family, was one of the select few that has the combination of selflessness, determination and support to be a tomb sentinel for almost three years.

On July 8, Carr Jr. made his last walk at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.

This is a Sentinel’s last act in honoring the Unknowns in an official capacity.

Joined by his wife of two years, Ally B. Carr, Carr Jr. placed roses on four of the tombs as his final sign of respect and reverence.

Carr said he was recruited straight out of the regimental orientation program, the three-week program that teaches new recruits marching and rifle skills. He’s only been assigned to the tomb, he said.

Training to be at the Tomb is not an easy task.

Mrs. Carr said her husband would shine shoes for four hours a day and constantly work on his uniform.

Despite the preparation, the rigors of training still shook Sgt. Carr ‘s confidence.

“I never thought I would pass,” said Carr Jr. “You just take it one task at a time. Like any training in the Army, you just take it one day, one task at a time. So that’s all I did. Eight months later, I completed the training.”

Mrs. Carr said during training they would both become very nervous for the tests he had to pass to become a Tomb Guard and earn his Tomb badge. Carr Jr. managed to meet the challenges and has worked at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier for 35 months.

Carr Jr. estimates he made around 900 walks, with over 500 changing of the guard ceremonies. The assignment wasn’t one he thought he was cut out for at first.

“I’m a local, I came here as a kid.” said Carr Jr. “I never imagined doing this. When I first got here I told my dad I wasn’t going to do it. He called me crazy.”

With a push from his father, Carr Jr. decided to take on the challenge. Ally said her husband was always meticulous and task oriented.

“I knew he had it in him,” she said.
Carr Jr. said it was with the help of his tremendous support system that he was able to work at the tomb for the past three years. It took the sacrifice of not only his time, but also his family’s.

“I have a huge support system,” said Mrs. Carr. “He has a huge support system. It’s one of the reasons why we are so good together. We had a lot of help.” The demands on the couple’s time didn’t cease for any reason, even

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. performs his final walk at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier July 8, 2015. Carr Jr. served at the Tomb for 35 months and performed 900 walks. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Brandon Dyer)

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. performs his final walk at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier July 8, 2015. Carr Jr. served at the Tomb for 35 months and performed 900 walks. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Brandon Dyer)

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. lays roses on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers on July 8, 2015 at Arlington National Cemetery. This was Carr's final act of respect and reverence before leaving his position as a Tomb sentinel.

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. lays roses on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers on July 8, 2015 at Arlington National Cemetery. This was Carr’s final act of respect and reverence before leaving his position as a Tomb sentinel.

when they got married while Carr Jr. was at the tomb. Luckily Mrs. Carr’s sister Juliann D. Guiffre has a background in event planning.

Helping execute their wedding wasn’t the first time she helped this couple.

“I went to college with Andy (Carr Jr.),” said Guiffre. “I introduced them.”

Guiffre said she knew Carr Jr. was the right choice for her sister as he trained for the tomb.

“He would get off from his Tomb training at six o’clock in the morning and drive three hours just to be with Ally,” said Guiffre. “His dedication to the military, his dedication to family really cemented my idea of him being my brother-in-law.”

It was only with the creative scheduling of his spouse and family that enabled Carr. Jr. to be so successful as a Tomb sentinel.

“The schedule is very demanding,” said Guiffre. “They both handled it really well. Ally is very understanding of the time he has to be away.”

“He’s missed every holiday,” said Mrs. Carr. “Everybody has been so understanding.”

Family holidays would take place the day after the holiday or the day before to help accommodate Carr Jr.’s hectic work schedule, said Mrs. Carr.

“He’s worked so hard,” said Mrs. Carr. “Crazy hard. You can’t imagine the lengths these guys go to stay as pristine and to stay focused.”

For Carr Jr., the sacrifices required pale in comparison to the honor of serving at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

“Service members give their lives and identities for this country.” said Carr Jr. “It’s worth protecting. These three service members deserve our hard work. That’s the drive. If that’s not your drive, you’re wrong.”

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. is joined by his wife, Ally B. Carr at the Rose Laying Ceremony July 8, 2015. Tomb sentinels are often joined by members of their family on their last walk at the Tomb.

Sgt. Steven A. Carr Jr. is joined by his wife, Ally B. Carr at the Rose Laying Ceremony July 8, 2015. Tomb sentinels are often joined by members of their family on their last walk at the Tomb.

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace Retires After 40+ Years

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace has a unique perspective.

       Enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps (WAC) in 1972, Pace has been in the Army Band field for over 40 years. Back when Pace first joined the Army, Women were still being taught how to do their make-up in basic training.

Pace said the Army has changed in the time she’s been apart of it “most significantly” for women.

“From not being a part of the Regular Army,” said Pace. “To the lift of combat exclusion.”

Retiring this week after 43 years of service, Pace has many milestones to her credit. Pace is the last active duty soldier from the WAC, the longest serving woman, and the only woman to ever command the Old Guard’s Fife and Drum Corps (FDC).

 

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace enlisted in 1972. (U.S. Army Photo)

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace enlisted in 1972. (U.S. Army Photo)

Pace has had many opportunities to be the first woman to accomplish things, she is hopeful it won’t be an “only” or “last” situation.

Though she is often uncomfortable in the spotlight, Pace said she found a way to accept the attention.

During her time with the FDC, Pace had a much different experience from other assignments.

“As the Commander I did not perform with the FDC; I was responsible for the quality of their musical performance but did not lead them in performances,” said Pace. “I did march with them on occasion during street parades.”

Pace said the highlight of her time at The Old Guard was when the nation was in need.

        “Aside from the obvious prestigious audiences, the most defining moment was the attack on the Pentagon on 9/11,” said Pace. “FDC Soldiers were involved with Operation Noble Eagle. We participated in recovery efforts and security measures at the Pentagon and on Fort Myer during the days that followed.”

Though many things in her time in the Army changed, there has always been one constant: Music.

“Music has been an integral part of Army life,” said Pace. “From the earliest days when musicians were utilized to rally the commands and entertained troops around the evening campfires!”

Pace said she was able to reach her goals by simply staying motivated.

“Many things I had little control of,” said Pace. “I guess recognizing opportunities that presented themselves and looking for challenges, not the comfortable jobs.”

By learning from superiors, peers, and subordinates, Pace stayed relevant. “Don’t be afraid of change,” said Pace. “Semper gumby – always flexible.” Pace said the advice she would want if she could do it all over again is to keep a better balance in life and take care of herself as much as others.

Pace’s future plans include utilizing her GI Bill and perhaps doing some substitute teaching.
“In other words, no full time job,” said Pace. “Part time to allow me to do some traveling and enjoy my hobbies.”

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace is the only woman to command the FDC. (U.S.Army Photo)

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jeanne Y. Pace is the only woman to command the FDC. (U.S.Army Photo)

Former Old Guard Soldier Awarded Tomb Badge

Col. Johnny Davis, commander, 3d U.S. Infantry regiment (The Old Guard), awards John Francis Curtis Jr., 77, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badge for his one-year of honorable service from August 1958 to August 1959 as a tomb sentinel. Davis presented the badge and a certificate during a ceremony in Curtis’ Philadelphia home, Feb. 11, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Luisito Brooks)

Col. Johnny Davis, commander, 3d U.S. Infantry regiment (The Old Guard), awards John Francis Curtis Jr., 77, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badge for his one-year of honorable service from August 1958 to August 1959 as a tomb sentinel. Davis presented the badge and a certificate during a ceremony in Curtis’ Philadelphia home, Feb. 11, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Luisito Brooks)

PHILADELPHIA – Only 630 Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badges have ever been awarded since its creation in 1958, second only to a badge awarded to U.S. service members who become astronauts.
During a private ceremony surrounded by his family and close friends, 77-year-old, John Francis Curtis Jr., former tomb sentinel, is now a badge holder for his honorable service to the U.S. Army at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Col. Johnny Davis, commander for the Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall-based 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), presented the badge to at Curtis’ residence here Feb. 11, 2015.
“What a pleasure it was for me to travel from Fort Myer, Va., to take part in a special ceremony,” said Davis. “The duty of serving at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a very special assignment that only a select few in our nation’s Army gets a chance to do, and Curtis did that.”
Curtis served at The Old Guard from Aug. 7, 1958 until Aug. 7, 1959. It was during his service with the regiment when he volunteered to guard the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery, Va. The Tomb receives between four to five million visitors annually, including dignitaries and foreign heads of state.
It is the solemn responsibility of the Tomb Guard to honor and guard the Tomb 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 365 days a year. Day and night, through summer heat and winter storms, the guards watch the tomb without pause.
He was retroactively awarded the badge because before 1959 it was issued only as a temporary wear item, which meant when Curtis left The Old Guard, he could not take the badge he was originally issued with him at the end of his duty.
Back then, Soldiers could wear the badge during their tenure as a Tomb Guard; however, upon completing their duty with the regiment, the badge was returned and reissued to incoming Soldiers.
In 1963, Army Regulation 600-8-22 allowed the badge to be worn as a permanent part of the military uniform, even after Soldiers have completed their duty at the Tomb of the Unknowns.
For Curtis, that time came 56 years after he completed his last walk, rifle in hand, at the Tomb. Curtis’ family initiated the process of helping him obtain a badge after the regulation change permitted him to wear it permanently. That happened only after Curtis, who had moved on in life to become a successful architect after his stint in the Army, was properly identified as a bonafide former tomb sentinel.
“What a great patriotic American family,” said Davis. “This is such a special day, and I am glad to share this day with you.”
Sgt. Patrick Leamy, currently serving as a tomb sentinel and who attended the ceremony, said a lot has changed at the Tomb since Curtis served, but noted that one common characteristic of all tomb sentinels, regardless of generation, is the total dedication from each tomb sentinel to the Unknowns.
“It’s not about us when we are out there walking the mat,” said Leamy. “The only thing that matters is the Unknowns whom we guard every day and night.”
He added that all Tomb Sentinels share that same feeling.
Leamy went on to say that meeting Curtis and being a part of the ceremony was a great experience.
“It was an honor to spend time with him and his family,” said Leamy. “Curtis couldn’t say much, but he had some expressions that let me know that he understood what was going on.”
In addition to the badge, Curtis also received the official orders for the badge, two unit certificates and one engraved unit coin.
“He has always earned this badge, but now we have a chance to present it to him in front of his family,” said Davis to Curtis, while embracing Curtis’ hand. “I just want to thank you for your service at the Tomb, to protect those who gave up everything, to include their last names.”

John Francis Curtis Jr., 77, former Tomb Sentinel, shows a photo of himself from 56 years earlier when he served as a tomb sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Feb. 11, 2015, at his residence in Philadelphia. Curtis was awarded the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badge by Col. Johnny Davis, commander, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), for his honorable service at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during a ceremony in his home. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Luisito Brooks)

John Francis Curtis Jr., 77, former Tomb Sentinel, shows a photo of himself from 56 years earlier when he served as a tomb sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Feb. 11, 2015, at his residence in Philadelphia. Curtis was awarded the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badge by Col. Johnny Davis, commander, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), for his honorable service at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during a ceremony in his home. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Luisito Brooks)

Uniting For a Run After Saving Life and Limb

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(Left to right) Tim Goodman, who was struck by a Metro bus last year while jogging last August, Sgt. 1st Class Brian Williams and Sgt. 1st Class John Russell, 289th Military Police Company military policemen, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), run together through the National Mall, Aug. 19. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Cody Torkelson)

Almost a year after the accident that severely fractured one of his legs and fractured his jaw, Tim Goodman met with the Soldiers assigned to the 289th Military Police Company, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), who rushed in to his aid and to go on a run with them through the National Mall, Aug. 19.

“I am so excited to be here spending time with these true heroes as we run into the city together,” said Tim, a Washington, D.C., running enthusiast. “If it wasn’t for them helping me as fast as they did last year, I probably wouldn’t be here now.”

Late August 2013, Tim was out jogging when he was struck by a Metro bus at the intersection of Seventh Street and Madison Drive in Washington, D.C. Fortunately for Tim, Capt. Quenten Vereen, Sgt. 1st Class Brian Williams, Sgt. 1st Class John Russell and Spc. Christopher Flane, 289th Military Policemen, were also jogging in the same area, heard the accident, and provided lifesaving medical treatment.

“I must have a guardian angel,” said Tim. “They were just in the right place at the right time.”

These Old Guard Soldiers reacted instinctively to stabilize the bleeding from his head and leg.

Russell said he was just glad to help. “We were across the street when it happened,” said Russell. “We didn’t know if there was a neck injury or spinal injury. There was a lot of blood on the ground and we had to check him out and do what we could.”

Tim was then rushed to the MedStar Washington Hospital Center for further care for his injuries.

After two days in the hospital, Tim was released and began the long road to recovery.

“Thankfully after a year, nothing hurts,” said Tim. “Running feels mechanically different than it used to be with this titanium rod in my leg.”

Tim said he knows it will take more time to feel fine, but if it doesn’t, he is fine with it because he’s still alive.

He added he doesn’t recall a lot from the because of how traumatic the injury was, but he actually considers that to be a huge blessing.

“I was conscious during the accident, but I guess I wasn’t all there,” said Tim. “Who wants to remember something like that anyways?”

He said he said the only thing he wanted to remember was the Soldiers who saved him. Russell and Williams said they made sure to keep in contact with Tim during his recovery via email.

“It was important to us to see how he was doing,” said Williams. “We wanted Tim to know that we were there if he needed anything.”

Williams said they would continue to check-in on Tim from time to time just to see his progress.

As a veteran, Tim understood the strong bond between the military and he was grateful for the friendship of these Soldiers.

Tim took a break from running for awhile to allow his body an opportunity to properly heal.

“I had to promise my doctors that I wouldn’t run because they know how I am,” said Tim. “When I got the OK to run again, I didn’t hold back.”

Tim said when he feels exhausted running up hills and down trails and his legs tremble with fatigue, there is one thought that helped him continue.

He could still be in crutches or he could be dead.

Tim ran a half marathon in May, a full marathon in June and plans on running the Marine Corps Marathon this October.

“I just took the healing one day at a time,” said Tim. “The fact that I am out running again with the guys that helped save me is a miracle on its own.”